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87. Friday - November 5, 1999 : SEVEN DISCARDS

Dealer: East
Vul: All

North

8 7 6 5 2
J 7
9 3
J 7 5 2

 

West

East

 

3
10 9 2
Q 8 7 2
A 10 6 4 3





 

South

 





 

South

West

North

East

 
 

 
End

 
 

1
 

4
 

You lead the 3. Partner cashes two spades, declarer playing the queen on the second round. On the third spade, declarer ruffs with the Q and then pulls seven rounds of trumps (partner was void). What three cards do you keep?

SOLUTION

Dealer: East
Vul: All

North

8 7 6 5 2
J 7
9 3
J 7 5 2

 

West

East

 

3
10 9 2
Q 8 7 2
A 10 6 4 3

A K J 10 9
-
K 10 6 5 4
Q 9 8

 

South

 

Q 4
A K Q 8 6 5 4
A J
K

Here is another deal where it was right to bid directly to four hearts with a very long trump suit. Slow bidders in the South seat allowed East-West to find five diamonds, a contract that makes with an overtrick.

Against four hearts, a spade was led to East, who cashed a second spade and led a third one. South ruffed high and played trumps - lots of them - seven to be exact. How should West think about the hand?

Perhaps this way: "declarer is leading all his trumps and keeping three cards. I need two tricks to defeat him. If my partner has the A, there is no problem. So I will aaume declarer has it and partner hold the K. If partner holds the K, there is also no problem in our getting two tricks. So I will assume he holds the Q and declarer the king."

"Does declarer hold the doubleton K-x, and the singleton A? That would give partner six diamonds and he opened the bidding one spade. No, declarer must hold two diamonds and one club. Therefore I can hold the same, two diamonds and one club, and declarer must go one down."

Bridge Today, Sep-Oct 1992, p. 20

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