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110. Sunday - November 28, 1999 : MISSED GEMS - 3

Dealer: West
Vul: E-W

North

A K J
A 8 4 2
A 9 7 6
3 2

 

West

East

 

-
Q 10 7
K Q 8 2
A K J 9 7 5

7 5 4 3 2
J 9 6 5
J 10 5 4
-

 

South

 

Q 10 9 8 6
K 3
3
Q 10 8 6 4

 

South

West

North

East

 
 

 
4

1
End

Double
 

Pass
 

Here are some deals froms the ACBL 1994 Summer Nationals in San Diego, in which a fantastic but logical play was missed at the table.

West led the A and East discarded the 5. West now shifted to the K. South won with dummy's ace and played the K and a heart to the ace. Next came dummy's club, East pitching a diamond. Declarer now cross-ruffed for 11 tricks.

East missed an unusual defense. Can you see it?

SOLUTION

Dealer: West
Vul: E-W

North

A K J
A 8 4 2
A 9 7 6
3 2

 

West

East

 

-
Q 10 7
K Q 8 2
A K J 9 7 5

7 5 4 3 2
J 9 6 5
J 10 5 4
-

 

South

 

Q 10 9 8 6
K 3
3
Q 10 8 6 4

Say he ruffs his partner's A and plays a trump. When the next club is played, he ruffs again and plays a second round of trumps. Declarer now would be unable to avoid defeat.

Although it is one of the worst crimes to ruff your partner's ace, sometimes, as on this example, it may be the only defense.



Bridge Today, Nov-Dec 1994, Martin Hoffman, p. 40

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